Australian Museum Journal Two new species of the henicopid centipede Henicops (Chilopoda: Lithobiomorpha) from Queensland and Victoria, with revision of species from Western Australia and a synoptic classification of Henicopidae

Shortform:
Hollington and Edgecombe, 2004, Rec. Aust. Mus. 56(1): 1–28
Author(s):
Hollington, Lauren M.; Edgecombe, Gregory D.
Year published:
2004
Title:
Two new species of the henicopid centipede Henicops (Chilopoda: Lithobiomorpha) from Queensland and Victoria, with revision of species from Western Australia and a synoptic classification of Henicopidae
Serial title:
Records of the Australian Museum
Volume:
56
Issue:
1
Start page:
1
End page:
28
DOI:
10.3853/j.0067-1975.56.2004.1392
Language:
English
Date published:
07 April 2004
Cover date:
07 April 2004
ISSN:
0067-1975
CODEN:
RAUMAJ
Publisher:
The Australian Museum
Place published:
Sydney, Australia
Subjects:
CHILOPODA; PALAEONTOLOGY; TAXONOMY
Digitized:
07 April 2004
Available online:
07 April 2004
Reference number:
1392
EndNote package:
EndNote file
Title page:
Title page (13kb PDF)
Complete work:
Complete work (6104kb PDF)

Abstract

Henicops Newport, 1844, is the most commonly recorded Australian genus of Henicopidae, the main southern temperate clade in Lithobiomorpha. Henicops is widespread throughout eastern and southwestern Australia and New Zealand, and is represented in New Caledonia by H. brevilabiatus (Ribaut, 1923) n.comb. New species are H. tropicanus n.sp. from northeastern Queensland and H. milledgei n.sp. from Victoria. The two nominal species from the southwest of Western Australia, H. dentatus Pocock, 1901a, and H. oligotarsus Attems, 1911, are synonymous, this species being distinguished from the Queensland H. tropicanus by details of the mandibular gnathal edge and female gonopod. Other characters used for diagnosing species and supraspecific groups within Henicops include the segmentation of the tarsi, tergite shape, and the position of the Tömösv&agrav;ry organ. All species of Henicopidae are listed with synonymies, generic assignments and geographic occurrences.