Australian Museum Journal Scientific results of the trawling expedition of H.M.C.S. "Thetis" off the coast of New South Wales, in February and March, 1898, Tunicata

Shortform:
Herdman and Riddell, 1913, Aust. Mus. Mem. 4(17): 873–889
Author(s):
Herdman, W. A.; Riddell, William
Year published:
1913
Title:
Scientific results of the trawling expedition of H.M.C.S. "Thetis" off the coast of New South Wales, in February and March, 1898, Tunicata
Serial title:
Australian Museum Memoir
Volume:
4
Issue:
17
Start page:
873
End page:
889
DOI:
10.3853/j.0067-1967.4.1913.1513
Language:
English
Plates:
plates xc–xcii
Date published:
10 May 1913
Cover date:
10 May 1913
ISSN:
0067-1967
CODEN:
AUNMA5
Publisher:
The Australian Museum
Place published:
Sydney, Australia
Digitized:
31 March 2009
Available online:
03 August 2009
Reference number:
1513
EndNote package:
EndNote file
Title page:
Title page (87kb PDF)
Complete work:
Complete work (2439kb PDF)

Abstract

The collection of Tunicata obtained during the trawling operations of the "Thetis" comprises twenty-five species, and most of these are familiar Australian forms. Three of the species appear to be new to science, and three are in such poor condition that they cannot be named with certainty. That no representatives of peculiar or exceptional genera were obtained is quite natural when we remember that the expedition was undertaken mainly for fisheries purposes, and that consequently the "Thetis" worked along the coasts of the State, north and south of Port Jackson, always within the 100 fathom line, and never more than thirty miles from shore. When we add that the Australian Tunicate fauna, and especially that of New South Wales, is one of the best known in the world, the small number of novelties found in this collection will cause no surprise. Believing, as we do, that the further elucidation of known forms is quite as important for science as the diagnosis of new species, we have not hesitated to add to this Report particulars ascertained from the "Thetis" specimens in regard to the structure and affinities of species already known to science.