Australian Museum Journal Three new Australian species of the fish genus Xenisthmus (Gobioidei: Xenisthmidae)

Shortform:
Gill and Hoese, 2004, Rec. Aust. Mus. 56(2): 241–246
Author(s):
Gill, Anthony C.; Hoese, Douglass F.
Year published:
2004
Title:
Three new Australian species of the fish genus Xenisthmus (Gobioidei: Xenisthmidae)
Serial title:
Records of the Australian Museum
Volume:
56
Issue:
2
Start page:
241
End page:
246
DOI:
10.3853/j.0067-1975.56.2004.1428
Language:
English
Date published:
07 July 2004
Cover date:
07 July 2004
ISSN:
0067-1975
CODEN:
RAUMAJ
Publisher:
The Australian Museum
Place published:
Sydney, Australia
Subjects:
FISHES
Digitized:
07 July 2004
Available online:
07 July 2004
Reference number:
1428
EndNote package:
EndNote file
Title page:
Title page (11kb PDF)
Complete work:
Complete work (247kb PDF)

Abstract

Xenisthmus chi n.sp., described from two specimens from Rowley Shoals, Timor Sea, has in combination: second dorsal-fin rays I,12; anal-fin rays I,11; predorsal area with narrow median wedge of scales extending forward almost to pore D; posterior naris without flap; and head and body pale with brown reticulate mottling, forming about 11 X-shaped markings along sides between pectoral- and caudal-fin bases. Xenisthmus eirospilus n.sp., described from 15 specimens from throughout the southwest Pacific (type locality Elizabeth Reef, Tasman Sea), has in combination: second dorsal-fin rays I,12–13, usually I,12; anal-fin rays I,11–12, usually I,11; vertebrae 10 + 17; tongue indented; posterior naris with well-developed flap; upper sides of body with 12 large closely spaced spots, which usually do not extend to dorsal edge of body; and predorsal scaled to vertical through posterior edge of preopercle. Xenisthmus semicinctus n.sp., described from two specimens from Rowley Shoals, Timor Sea, has in combination: second dorsal-fin rays I,12; anal-fin rays I,11; vertebrae 10 + 17; tongue indented; posterior naris with well-developed flap; upper sides of body with 12 large, closely spaced spots, each connecting dorsally to, or almost to, mid-line by short, dark bar; and predorsal area with narrow median wedge of scales extending forward almost to pore D.

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