Australian Museum Journal Metrical features of Aboriginal crania from coastal New South Wales, Australia

Shortform:
Freedman, 1964, Rec. Aust. Mus. 26(12): 309–326
Author(s):
Freedman, L.
Year published:
1964
Title:
Metrical features of Aboriginal crania from coastal New South Wales, Australia
Serial title:
Records of the Australian Museum
Volume:
26
Issue:
12
Start page:
309
End page:
326
DOI:
10.3853/j.0067-1975.26.1964.680
Language:
English
Date published:
04 December 1964
Cover date:
04 December 1964
ISSN:
0067-1975
CODEN:
RAUMAJ
Publisher:
The Australian Museum
Place published:
Sydney, Australia
Subjects:
ABORIGINES: AUSTRALIAN; ANATOMY: HUMAN
Digitized:
07 April 2009
Available online:
23 July 2009
Reference number:
680

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander users are warned that this material may contain images of deceased persons or images of places that could cause sorrow

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EndNote file
Title page:
Title page (102kb PDF)
Complete work:
Complete work (1338kb PDF)

Abstract

The racial origin of the Australian Aboriginal is still the subject of much controversy, despite the considerable number of studies which have been made over the last 100 years. Past investigations have included many aspects of physical anthropology, archaeology, linguistics and social anthropology, but different approaches, techniques and interpretations have resulted primarily in two basically opposed hypotheses. These are: (a)The Aboriginal Australians are the descendants of a single basic stock which invaded the virgin continent. Local differences found to-day in the frequencies of some of their physical features are primarily the result of chance variations which became established in semi-isolated populations (cf. Abbie, 1951). (b) Successive waves of immigrants of different basic stock colonized the Australian continent. The frequency variations of certain features found between Aborigines inhabiting the different parts of the Australian continent are closely related to the varying proportions of the contributing stocks in these populations (cf. Birdsell, 1949 and 1950).

The current study deals with the variations in certain metrical features of Aboriginal crania from various parts of coastal New South Wales. With this as a basis, it is hoped to record, analyse and compare cranial data from Aboriginal populations of various other localised areas of Australia in an attempt to test, and possibly help resolve, the differences between the two currently held divergent views.