Australian Museum Journal Neogene to Recent species of Krithe (Crustacea: Ostracoda) from the Tasman Sea and off southern Australia with description of five new species

Shortform:
Ayress et al., 1999, Rec. Aust. Mus. 51(1): 1–22
Author(s):
Ayress, M. A.; Barrows, T.; Passlow, V.; Whatley, R.
Year published:
1999
Title:
Neogene to Recent species of Krithe (Crustacea: Ostracoda) from the Tasman Sea and off southern Australia with description of five new species
Serial title:
Records of the Australian Museum
Volume:
51
Issue:
1
Start page:
1
End page:
22
DOI:
10.3853/j.0067-1975.51.1999.486
Language:
English
Date published:
06 July 1999
Cover date:
06 July 1999
ISSN:
0067-1975
CODEN:
RAUMAJ
Publisher:
The Australian Museum
Place published:
Sydney, Australia
Subjects:
CRUSTACEA: OSTRACODA; PALAEONTOLOGY
Digitized:
06 July 1999
Available online:
06 July 1999
Reference number:
486
EndNote package:
EndNote file
Title page:
Title page (11kb PDF)
Complete work:
Complete work (609kb PDF)

Abstract

The ostracod genus Krithe is reported from four grab, two box-core, 62 coretop samples, and Neogene to Quaternary DSDP cores from the abyssal and bathyal regions of the Tasman Sea and off southern Australia. Species identification followed the taxonomic system proposed by Coles et al. (1994), in which the anterodorsal radial pore canals are of fundamental importance. A total of 19 species are recognised, five species are described as new: K. comma, K. dilata, K. pseudocomma, K. prolata, and K. triangularis. Fifteen species are referred to previously described species, and the remaining rare species are left in open nomenclature. Although no living specimens have been recovered, shells of all species have been found in modern sediments and are, therefore, considered to be extant. Overall, the stratigraphic distribution of the species demonstrates an increase in diversity from 3 to 19 species since the Early Miocene, with no extinction. The bathymetric range of most species is wide, though in certain species there are significant differences between the two study regions, such as on the Australian Continental Slope, the relatively much deeper occurrences of K. triangularis and K. marialuisae, and the absence of K. dolichodeira a species found commonly elsewhere. An explanation for such differences is most likely to relate to nutrient, substrate, and oceanographic differences between the two regions.