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Alexander the Great teacher surveys

By: Chris Lang, Category: Museullaneous, Date: 18 Jan 2013

We surveyed teachers about their personal and professional usage of digital technologies.

Web 2U (#8)

Michael Hugill © Australian Museum

Approximately 300 teachers were invited to a special viewing of the Alexander the Great: 2000 years of treasures exhibition on November 28, 2012.

67 teachers completed a survey about their personal, professional and students’ usage and awareness of digital technologies. Although the results are not statistically certain due to the relatively low number of responses, the results still give a good indication of the increasing adoption of the digital in the educational sphere.

Nearly two thirds own a smartphone or similar mobile device, with Samsung continuing to encroach on iPhone (as has been observed recently), however NFC (near-field communication, which we are beginning to use for the delivery of rich content via Tapit) remains low.

More than 75% of those surveyed use social media, over 50% using Facebook, and over 40% using Google+.

Teachers would overwhelmingly prefer for us to communicate with them via email/e-newsletters rather than traditional post (4%) or fax (1%), although knowledge of our programs are also spread by word of mouth and researching our website.

A wide range of technologies are available to students, at least half having access to laptops, and around a third of classrooms having smartboards.

In a separate question the vast majority of respondents said that at least 90% of their students have access to a mobile device of some kind and would allow them to be used in the Alexander the Great exhibition.