Blog

Category: Science

Humphead Maori Wrasse - up close and personal

This movie shows the species very nicely.  The fish swims so close to the camera it gives us a great view of its fleshy lips, colour pattern on the head and the forehead hump (click on the link to 'Hyperostosis - Swollen Bones' to find out more about this phenomenon).

By: Mark McGrouther, Category: Science, Date: 14 Sep 2010

Fish frontiers

Fish scientists find on average about one species per week previously unknown from Australian waters, yet there is still so much we don’t know, says Museum ichthyologist Dr Jeff Leis.

By: Brendan Atkins, Category: Science, Date: 13 Sep 2010

Candiru - careful where you go...

Over the years quite a few people have asked me about the Candiru.  Is it really true that this fish can end up inside the bladder of an unfortunate person who urinates in the wrong stream?

By: Mark McGrouther, Category: Science, Date: 12 Sep 2010

This week in Fish: Deepsea anglerfishes and the Lilac-tip Basslet

Highlights for the week include a new movie from Agent 1 on 'The exciting life of Anglerfishes, a movie showing a halosaur at a depth of 1027 m and an outrageously coloured Lilac-tip Basslet swimming on the HMAS Brisbane.  Thank you as always to all our contributors.

By: Mark McGrouther, Category: Science, Date: 10 Sep 2010

Psychedelic frogfish makes a splash

In 2009, colleagues at the University of Washington, created quite a stir when they described a new species of frogfish from Indonesia.  The fish goes by the scientific name Histiophryne psychedelica.  When you watch the movie you'll probably agree that psychedelica is a good name for this strange fish.

By: Mark McGrouther, Category: Science, Date: 08 Sep 2010

Common and Standard Names

Someone asked me about the difference between common and standard names.  The video covers this topic and more.

By: Mark McGrouther, Category: Science, Date: 06 Sep 2010

The exciting life of Anglerfishes

Ichthyology Collection Manager, Mark McGrouther, talks about deepsea anglerfishes.

By: Mark McGrouther, Category: Science, Date: 06 Sep 2010

This week in Fish: Shrek Fish, Frill and Megamouth Sharks

This week we feature movies of three strange fishes that were on other websites.  To each we have included additional information. As usual we are delighted to show movies and images from 'local' contributors. More images and fact sheets have been migrated from the old site.  As always - thank you to all our contributors!

By: Mark McGrouther, Category: Science, Date: 03 Sep 2010

Asian Sheepshead Wrasse

A weird-looking fish that people have compared with Shrek, the animated character, has been filmed in Japan.  The fish is an Asian Sheepshead Wrasse, Semicossyphus reticulatus.  It is a labrid fish (family Labridae) that occurs in China, Japan, and both North and South Korea. Australia is home to over 180 species of wrasses.  Regrettably for divers, the Asian Sheepshead Wrasse is not one of them.

By: Mark McGrouther, Category: Science, Date: 03 Sep 2010

Frill Shark in Japan

The Frill Shark normally lives in oceanic waters at depths from 120 m to 1500 m. This fish was filmed alive (although most likely moribund) by Japanese divers.

By: Mark McGrouther, Category: Science, Date: 29 Aug 2010