Blog

Category: Science

DigiVol: What......you work with dead insects!

Read here about two volunteers who work on the Digitisation Project

By: Leonie Prater, Category: Science, Date: 24 Nov 2011

The Australian Museum Student Forum 2011


Showcasing the research done by students associated with the Museum...

By: Michael Hugill, Category: Science, Date: 22 Nov 2011

This week in Fish: Murray Cod Movie

This week we show movies taken at depths of 4 m and 2400 m.  The first movie shows what may be the first footage ever taken of a Murray Cod guarding its eggs in a dam.  The second movie shows a Threadfin Seasnail swimming down a deep rocky slope.  As always there are also some great images.  Thank you to everyone who contributed.

By: Mark McGrouther, Category: Science, Date: 18 Nov 2011

For Arts Sake! – Visiting Bali #10

What should we eat in Bali?

By: Dr Stan Florek, Category: Science, Date: 16 Nov 2011

Two new species of moss frog discovered

The mist-shrouded mountains of Vietnam reveal two new species of moss frog.

By: Dr Jodi Rowley, Category: Science, Date: 16 Nov 2011

For Arts Sake! – Visiting Bali #9

Expedition to Java Sea.

By: Dr Stan Florek, Category: Science, Date: 14 Nov 2011

This week in Fish: Hagfishes - masters of defence

This week we show remarkable footage of hagfish using slime as a defence mechanism.  These fishes are also active hunters.  There are some great new images, plus the first sighting of 'the' undescribed anglerfish guarding its eggs.

By: Mark McGrouther, Category: Science, Date: 11 Nov 2011

DigiVol: The Wonder of Insects

Rapid Digitisation Project: Check out these amazing images (on the right) of cicadas, tree hoppers, leaf hoppers, long legged flies and hawk moths taken by our volunteers...

By: Leonie Prater, Category: Science, Date: 11 Nov 2011

For Arts Sake! – Visiting Bali #8

A Microcosm of the Ubud Market.

By: Dr Stan Florek, Category: Science, Date: 10 Nov 2011

Amazing new hagfish behaviour

Hagfishes are incredible! They can stop a would-be predator within seconds with a mouthful of slime. Ichthyologists at the National Museum of New Zealand (Te Papa Tongarewa) have just published a fascinating paper on hagfish behaviour in the journal Nature.

By: Mark McGrouther, Category: Science, Date: 09 Nov 2011