Animal Species:Orange Leaf-nosed Bat

Orange Leaf-nosed Bats are very sensitive to people disturbing them in their roosts. They will often not return to a roost if it is disturbed more than a few times.

Orange Leaf-nosed Bat

GB Baker © Australian Museum

Standard Common Name

Orange Leaf-nosed Bat

Habitat

Orange Leaf-nosed Bats prefer warm humid caves, although some have been found in hollow tree trunks and roost together in colonies that can be as small as 20 or as large as a few thousand bats.

Feeding and Diet

Orange Leaf-nosed Bats feed mainly on moths, but also on beetles, weevils, bugs, wasps and ants. They often feed close to their roost site, returning to the roost several times during the night's feeding.

Economic/social impacts

Orange Leaf-nosed Bats are vulnerable to disturbance from human visitors to cave roosts, destruction of caves by mining, and loss of feeding habitat by clearing and land degradation from agriculture.

Classification

Species:
aurantius
Genus:
Rhinonicteris
Family:
Hipposideridae
Order:
Chiroptera
Subclass:
Eutheria
Subphylum:
Vertebrata
Phylum:
Chordata
Kingdom:
Animalia

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Tags bats, mammals, flight, flying, eutherians, placentals, vertebrates, bats in Australia, identification,

2 comments

Chris Hosking - 3.12 PM, 09 December 2010

Yes , loss of habitat is a leading cause of the decline of a species.

diana oliver - 5.12 PM, 03 December 2010
I have found dead orange leaf nose bats on my verandah. There has been land clearing at the river edge of eucalyptus trees and other vegetation not far from my home on the Ord River. Could these bats have died because of degradation to their nesting places? Can someone please answer this question. Diana

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