Animal Species:Mosaic Moray, Enchelycore ramosa (Griffin, 1926)

The Mosaic Moray has a long snout with curved jaws and needle-like teeth.  The species occurs on rocky reefs in subtropical to warm temperate marine waters of the South Pacific.

Mosaic Moray, Enchelycore ramosa

Erik Schlögl © Erik Schlögl

Standard Common Name

Mosaic Moray

Identification

The Mosaic Moray has a long snout with curved jaws. There are many needle-like teeth that are visible when the mouth is closed. It is yellow to grey with a mosaic pattern of darker lines.

Size range

The species grows to 1.5 m in length.

Distribution

The Mosaic Moray occurs in subtropical to warm temperate marine waters of the South Pacific. In Australia it is only known from New South Wales (including Lord Howe Island).

Distribution by collection data

Ozcam map of Mosaic Moray specimens in the Australian Museums.

What does this mean?

Habitat

The Mosaic Moray is found on rocky reefs.

Feeding and Diet

It feeds at night on fishes and crustaceans.

Classification

Species:
ramosa
Genus:
Enchelycore
Family:
Muraenidae
Order:
Anguilliformes
Class:
Actinopterygii
Subphylum:
Vertebrata
Phylum:
Chordata
Kingdom:
Animalia

What does this mean?

References

  1. Hutchins, B. & R. Swainston. 1986. Sea Fishes of Southern Australia. Complete Field Guide for Anglers and Divers. Swainston Publishing. Pp. 180.
  2. Kuiter, R.H. 1996. Guide to Sea Fishes of Australia. New Holland. Pp. 433. Kuiter, R.H. 2000. Coastal Fishes of South-eastern Australia. Gary Allen. Pp. 437.

 


Mark McGrouther , Collection Manager, Ichthyology
Last Updated:

Tags fishes, ichthyology, muraenidae, Mosaic Moray, Enchelycore ramosa, eel, curved jaw, needle-like teeth, rocky reef, subtropical water, temperate water, marine, adult, long snout, yellow, grey, mosaic pattern, complex pattern, > 1m,