Light Photomicrography

As a microscopist you often have to work with specimens that are difficult to focus. When viewing a 3-D specimen using an optical microscope you frequently cannot see the entire specimen in focus at any one time, due to depth of field limitations.

Leica MZ 16 stereo microscope with Spot Flex

Martin Pueschel © Australian Museum

Your only option is to view a series of partially focused images. If it is critical to see the whole specimen in focus, then you may have to manipulate several images with computer software or draw it by hand, to produce the picture you are after.

Various software packages – Auto-Montage Pro, Helicon Focus 4.21 Pro, combine the in-focus sections of the source images to produce one perfectly focused montage image in seconds.

The M&M lab has three optical microscope setups that allow the scientist to capture a series of images, montage and produce a measurable 3-D image of their specimen:
 

  • Leica MZ 16 stereo microscope with polarization and transmitted light base with the Spot Flex Digital Camera System including imaging software: Auto Montage, Photoshop CS, Genuine Fractle 4
  • Olympus BX50 Microscope with polarization, DIC, 100x UPlanFl oil, 40x UPlanFl, 20x UPlanFl, 10x UPlanFl with the Spot Flex Digital Camera System including imaging software: Auto Montage, Photoshop CS, Genuine Fractle 4
     
  • Canon D7 and Nikon D3X Micro Imaging System with Infinity Long Distance Microscope tube and Objectives (CF2, CF3, CF4, CF5, HDF2). ML-1000 illuminator, Micro Nikkor 105mm f/2.8D and 60mm f/2.8D lens, Canon EFS 18-200mm f/3.5-5.6 IS including imaging software: Photoshop CS4, Helicon Focus 5 Pro.

 

 

 


Mr Martin Pueschel , Scientific Illustrator
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