Animal Species:Green and Golden Bell Frog

The Green and Golden Bell Frog was once one of the most common frog species on Australia's south-eastern coast.

Green and Golden Bell Frog, Litoria aurea

Gunther Schmider © Australian Museum

Standard Common Name

Green and Golden Bell Frog

Size range

8.5 cm

Distribution

The Green and Golden Bell Frog is found in eastern New South Wales.

Habitat

The Green and Golden Bell Frog occurs in large, permanent, open-water swamps or ponds that have a variable water level and dense vegetation.

Communication

The Green and Golden Bell Frog has a distinctive three-part call that sounds a bit like a motor bike changing gears.

Conservation Status

Green and Golden Bell Frog populations have declined, probably as a result of habitat loss, introduced predators and other factors. It was listed as endangered under the New South Wales Threatened Species Act and is classified as vulnerable nationally.

In Sydney, despite this population decline, it is still present in a number of sites. One of these was the 2000 Olympic Games site at Homebush Bay, right where the tennis courts were meant to be built. The presence of the frog meant the building plans were halted and the courts eventually built elsewhere. Because of other work on the site, more frog habitat had to be created nearby. The Homebush Bay population has been monitored by the Australian Museum ever since and seems to be stable despite the surrounding site development.

Conservation Status (NSW): Endangered species

What does this mean?

Classification

Species:
aurea
Genus:
Litoria
Family:
Hylidae
Order:
Anura
Subclass:
Lissamphibia
Subphylum:
Vertebrata
Phylum:
Chordata
Kingdom:
Animalia

What does this mean?


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Tags frogs, amphibians, vertebrates, identification, wildlife of sydney,

1 comment

JesZ123 - 6.08 PM, 20 August 2009
Fab info. Thanks.

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