Animal Species:Gould's Long-eared Bat

Gould's Long-eared Bats hunt low to the ground, and can sometimes be caught by cats hunting at night.

Gould's Long-eared Bat on tree trunk

GB Baker ©  Australian Museum

Standard Common Name

Gould's Long-eared Bat

Identification

The very long ears of Gould's Long-eared Bats,Nyctophilus gouldii, fold down when they are resting. Body measurements separate it from the smaller Lesser Long-eared Bat and the Greater Long-eared Bat. Fur colour can be dark brown to dark grey with a light grey underside.

Size range

Head and body length to 58mm, tail to 55mm.

Distribution

Gould's Long-eared Bats are found along the east coast of Australia from Atherton in Queensland through eastern NSW and into south east Victoria. They are also found in the south west corner of Western Australia.

Habitat

Gould's Long-eared Bats roost in hollows in old trees in eucalypts but sometimes in buildings. Up to 25 female bats may live together in a colony although males generally roost alone. Individuals can sometimes be found under the bark of trees and in old nests of birds such as Fairy Martens.

Feeding and Diet

Gould's long-eared Bats fly close to the ground when hunting and catch flying insects and also snatch non-flying insects off the ground or leaves. They usually eat their prey as they fly.

Other behaviours and adaptations

The bats will hibernate in winter for stretches of up to eleven days at a time living off fats stored during the late summer and early autumn.

Life cycle

Gould's Long-eared Bats only breed once a year and usually give birth to one or two young in late spring or early summer. The young are weaned at the age of six weeks and can be seen flying in January.

Conservation Status

Gould's Long-eared Bats are vulnerable to loss of tree hollows and loss of feeding grounds by forestry activities,pesticides,clearing for agriculture and housing.

Classification

Species:
gouldii
Genus:
Nyctophilus
Family:
Vespertilionidae
Order:
Chiroptera
Subclass:
Eutheria
Subphylum:
Vertebrata
Phylum:
Chordata
Kingdom:
Animalia

What does this mean?


Sue Burrell , Interpretive Officer
Last Updated:

Tags bats, mammals, flight, flying, eutherians, placentals, vertebrates, identification, bats in Australia,