Fishing line, carrejun

Fishing lines were two-ply twine made from the bark of several different plants including Cabbage Tree Palm, Livistona australis, and probably the Kurrajong tree, Brachychiton populneus. In addition to bark, fibres from Settler's Flax, Gymnostachys anceps, were used to make fishing line.

Bundle of twine

 © Australian Museum

Fishing lines were two-ply twine made from the bark of several different plants including Cabbage Tree Palm, Livistona australis, and probably the Kurrajong tree, Brachychiton populneus. In addition to bark, fibres from Settler's Flax, Gymnostachys anceps, were used to make fishing line.

The coastal word for fishing line was carrejun or carrahjun - a word now used as the common name (Kurrajong) for the tree Brachychiton populneus.

'the [fishing] lines appear to be manufactured from the bark of various trees which we found here of a tough, stringy nature' Captain John Hunter, 1793

Small stones called gna'mmul were tied to the lines as sinkers.


Dr Val Attenbrow , Principal Research Scientist
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