Animal Species:Common Stingaree, Trygonoptera testacea Müller & Henle, 1841

The Common Stingaree occurs from southern Queensland to southern New South Wales where it is commonly observed in shallow coastal estuaries and reefs.  At least six species of stingarees are known to live along the New South Wales coast making it often very difficult to identify an individual in the wild.

Standard Common Name

Common Stingaree

Identification

The Common Stingaree is dark brown to grey above and white below. It has a small dorsal fin or a narrow ridge of skin in front of one or two strong, venomous spines on the tail, and a leaf-shaped caudal fin. The shape of the caudal fin is one of the characteristics which separate the stingarees (family Urolophidae) from the other rays including the stingrays (family Dasyatididae) and the skates (family Rajidae).

At least six species of stingarees are known to live along the New South Wales coast. They can be very difficult to identify.

Size range

This species grows to 47cm in length.

Distribution

The Common Stingaree occurs from southern Queensland to southern New South Wales.

Distribution by collection data

Ozcam map of Common Stingaree specimens in the Australian Museums.

What does this mean?

Habitat

The Common Stingaree is most often observed in shallow coastal estuaries and reefs.

Classification

Species:
testacea
Genus:
Trygonoptera
Family:
Urolophidae
Order:
Myliobatiformes
Class:
Chondrichthyes
Subphylum:
Vertebrata
Phylum:
Chordata
Kingdom:
Animalia

What does this mean?

References

  1. Hoese, D.F., Bray, D.J., Paxton, J.R. & G.R. Allen. 2006. Fishes. In Beesley, P.L. & A. Wells. (eds) Zoological Catalogue of Australia. Volume 35. ABRS & CSIRO Publishing: Australia. parts 1-3, pages 1-2178.
  2. Kuiter, R.H. 1996. Guide to Sea Fishes of Australia. New Holland. Pp. 433.
  3. Kuiter, R.H. 2000. Coastal Fishes of South-eastern Australia. Gary Allen. Pp. 437. Last, P.R. & ; J.D. Stevens. 1994 Sharks and Rays of Australia. CSIRO. Pp. 513.
  4. Last, P.R. & J.D. Stevens. 2009. Sharks and Rays of Australia. Edition 2. CSIRO. Pp. 644, Pl. 1-91.

 


Mark McGrouther , Collection Manager, Ichthyology
Last Updated:

Tags fish, ichthyology, Common Stingaree, Trygonoptera testacea, Wildlife of Sydney, Urolophidae, dark brown, grey, white underside, shallow water, coastal estuaries, coral reef, venomous, leaf-shaped caudal, 30 cm - 1 m, marine, adult,

4 comments

Mark McGrouther - 8.09 AM, 27 September 2011

Hi fernando.  The easiest way to distinguish stingarees from stingrays is to look at the tail.  A stingaree's tail ends in a leaf-like lobe, which is very different from the whip-like pointed tail of a stingray.

fernando - 7.09 PM, 26 September 2011
What is the difference between Stingray and Stingaree? does anyone know?! Thank you!
Mark McGrouther - 8.08 AM, 27 August 2010

Thanks for your comment Max. I haven't had the 'pleasure' of being jabbed by a stingray spine.  I believe that the experience is very painful.

max.murray - 2.08 PM, 26 August 2010
yer i got stung by some sting ray and it was arosing

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