Animal Species:Comb Wrasse, Coris picta (Bloch & Schneider, 1801)

The Comb Wrasse occurs in coastal and offshore rocky reefs in Australia and New Zealand.  Mature male and female fish look similar, but within seconds males can assume a territorial or display colouration in which the black stripe disappears.

A Comb Wrasse at Magic Point

Ákos Lumnitzer © Ákos Lumnitzer

Standard Common Name

Comb Wrasse

Identification

The Comb Wrasse has a pointed snout and an elongate body that is covered with ctenoid (view scale pages) scales.

Adults have a broad mid-lateral black stripe with comb-like extensions ventrally, hence the common name. Mature male and female fish look similar, but within seconds males can assume a territorial or display colouration in which the black stripe disappears.

Juveniles resemble Common Cleanerfish, a species well known for feeding on parasites of larger fishes. Juvenile Comb Wrasse can also pick parasites off larger fishes. Other species of fishes also feed in this way. View the fact sheets for the Eastern Cleaner Clingfish and Axilspot Hogfish.

Size range

The Comb Wrasse grows to 24 cm in length.

Distribution

It occurs in coastal and offshore rocky reefs in Australia and New Zealand.  In Australia the Comb Wrasse is known from southern Queensland to southern New South Wales.

The map below shows the Australian distribution of the species based on public sightings and specimens in Australian Museums. Click on the map for detailed information.  Source: Atlas of Living Australia.

Coris picta

Distribution by collection data

Ozcam map of Comb Wrasse specimens in the Australian Museum.

What does this mean?

Classification

Species:
picta
Genus:
Coris
Family:
Labridae
Order:
Perciformes
Class:
Actinopterygii
Subphylum:
Vertebrata
Phylum:
Chordata
Kingdom:
Animalia

What does this mean?

References

  1. Edgar, G.J. 1997. Australian Marine Life: the plants and animals of temperate waters. Reed Books. Pp. 544.
  2. Hutchins, B. & R. Swainston. 1986. Sea Fishes of Southern Australia. Complete Field Guide for Anglers and Divers. Swainston Publishing. Pp. 180.
  3. Kuiter, R.H. 1996. Guide to Sea Fishes of Australia. New Holland. Pp. 433.
  4. Kuiter, R.H. 2000. Coastal Fishes of South-eastern Australia. Gary Allen. Pp. 437.
  5. Kuiter, R.H. 2002. Fairy and Rainbow Wrasses and their Relatives. A Comprehensive Guide to Selected Labroids. TMC Publishing. Pp. 208.


Mark McGrouther , Collection Manager, Ichthyology
Last Updated:

Tags fish, ichthyology, Comb Wrasse, Coris picta, Labridae, white, black, 'normal fish', odd-shaped, 10 cm - 30 cm, stripes or bands, marine, adult,