Animal Species:Bluespotted Fantail Ray, Taeniura lymma (Forsskål, 1775)

The Bluespotted Fantail Ray is a common species throughout much of the Indo-West Pacific. It occurs in shallow tropical marine waters, feeding on molluscs on the rising tide.

A Bluespotted Fantail Ray at Pulau Redang

Erik Schlögl © Erik Schlögl

Standard Common Name

Bluespotted Fantail Ray

Identification

The Bluespotted Fantail Ray can be recognised by the blue spots on the disc and pelvic fins, and by the stripe along either side of the tail. There are usually two stings located well back on the tail.

Size range

The species grows to a length of 70 cm and a disc width of 30 cm.

Distribution

It is a common species throughout much of the Indo-West Pacific.

In Australia it is recorded in shallow tropical marine waters from the central coast of Western Australia, around the tropical north, and south to the northern coast of New South Wales.

Distribution by collection data

Ozcam map of Bluespotted Fantail Ray specimens in the Australian Museums.

What does this mean?

Habitat

In occurs in shallow tropical marine waters.

Feeding and Diet

Bluespotted Fantail Rays are known to migrate in large schools into shallow water to feed on molluscs on the rising tide. On the falling tide the fish move back into deeper water to shelter under ledges and in caves.

Classification

Species:
lymma
Genus:
Taeniura
Family:
Dasyatidae
Class:
Chondrichthyes
Subphylum:
Vertebrata
Phylum:
Chordata
Kingdom:
Animalia

What does this mean?

References

  1. Kuiter, R.H. 1996. Guide to Sea Fishes of Australia. New Holland. Pp. 433.
  2. Last, P.R. & J.D. Stevens. 1994 Sharks and Rays of Australia. CSIRO. Pp. 513.
  3. Randall, J.E., Allen, G.R. & R.C. Steene. 1997. Fishes of the Great Barrier Reef and Coral Sea. Crawford House Press. Pp. 557.

 


Mark McGrouther , Collection Manager, Ichthyology
Last Updated:

Tags Fishes, Ichthyology, Bluespotted Fantail Ray, Taeniura lymma, Dasyatidae, ray, marine, adult, tropical water, shallow water, blue spots, dots/spots, stripes or bands, two stings, 30 cm - 1 m, Indo-West Pacific,